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Odds & Sods

Standing on the shoulders of Isaac Newton!

Isaac Newton, the greatest scientist of all time!

Isaac Newton, the greatest scientist of all time!

“Hero” might seem to be the wrong word to use when one looks at dictionary definitions of the word, but Isaac Newton is someone whose work I admire greatly, whose career was wider and more interesting than most people know, a scholar who revolutionised science, a man of such single minded dedication that he stuck a bodkin in his eyeball as part of an experiment, a transformer of the Royal Mint, and ….. a man who I have a “family tree” connection to!


My wife and I travelled to Glasgow for the inauguration lecture by the late Professor John Ottaway as he was confirmed as a Fellow of The Royal Society, excited to be meeting up with him again and our fellow PhD students from several years back. We had been only his second and third PhD successes in Chemistry in 1971-74, my wife also being the first female doctorate from her country, Nepal.

I guess everyone expected a technical presentation about his latest research and direction, so for the first 5 minutes they weren’t disappointed. But then John changed direction and started to talk about…… his students, beginning with Colin (his first) and a married couple (ourselves), regarding not only our research but also the strong social relationship we shared and how that was important to him. Within a few minutes he had a slide looking like a family tree with himself at the top as a father and his successful PhDs underneath as his children.
But then he moved upwards, and told of himself as a student at Exeter with Professor Eddie Bishop as his supervisor, (our metaphorical science “grandfather”) before moving up again showing the name of Professor Bishop’s supervisor (our great grandfather). He continued like this working backwards through THREE centuries but goodness knows how he traced all of the records.

You may now have worked out where this is going, but eventually the whole audience is stunned as he works back to and stops at ………… Isaac Newton! I still feel emotional as I remember that day, that moment, bloody hell, seeing myself and my wife linked scientifically to Isaac, unbelievable.


“If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants” is a saying attributed to Isaac in 1676, maybe one of his only moments of acknowledging the exploits and discoveries of scientists before him.
Since that time we have visited Isaac’s house in Lincolnshire and read several books about him and his life.

Firstly there is the beautifully created Newton’s Notebook written by Joel Levy which gives a fascinating insight to the whole of his life and his work.

Newton's Notebook

Inside Newton's notebook

Inside Newton’s notebook

Then there is Newton and the Counterfeiter by Thomas Levenson. It is the true story of how Newton became Master if the Royal Mint, transformed its running at The Tower, and how he tracked down the infamous counterfeiter William Chaloner. As Levenson says, “Chaloner had no idea who he was taking on as Newton pursued his enemy with the cold implacable logic that he brought to his scientific research.”

Counterfeiter

Finally there is the gargantuan trilogy by Neal Stephenson, The Baroque Cycle, set in time from 17th to 18th Centuries across America, Africa and Europe. These books are amongst the finest I have ever read, historical, political, science, pirates, detective work …… and Isaac Newton. If I told you more it would be a massive spoiler, but be patient and know that Daniel Waterhouse in the first book is a close friend of Isaac!

So this is our tribute to Isaac Newton, in our view ‘the greatest scientist of all time”. Do you agree?

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Discussion

11 thoughts on “Standing on the shoulders of Isaac Newton!

  1. Agreed! It must be great being linked to the greats, not because of family, but because of your love for your profession and dedication to it. I congratulate you and your wife on it. Might I also add that I’ll check out those books you’ve mentioned because they seem to have a curious mix of all kinds of things. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    Posted by Pradita Kapahi | January 31, 2017, 19:15
  2. I like when I see fictional/non-fictional work on famous people. Until I see Hollywood making a movie called “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Killer.” Then we know it’s gone overboard.

    Liked by 1 person

    Posted by Major Styles | January 31, 2017, 13:20
    • Let me reassure you Ron that The Baroque Cycle is relatively true to historical events, beginning in the US at the time of independence. Most of the early parts of the book entwine Isaac at university, then it the last book as far as I can tell it accurately reflects how he created a standard approach to coinage. More than a genius!

      Like

      Posted by Dr B | January 31, 2017, 13:47
      • Excellent. I have added that to my reading list. I am trying to get through Dostoyevsky’s “The Idiot” and “the Wealth of Nations” at the moment though.

        Liked by 1 person

        Posted by Major Styles | January 31, 2017, 15:35
        • Ah, Adam Smith, we’ll make a Thatcherite of you yet! I’m struggling with The Idiot, not intellectually just time wise. The a Prince has just finished his first meeting at The Generals house.

          Liked by 1 person

          Posted by Dr B | January 31, 2017, 15:39
        • “…Adam Smith, we’ll make a Thatcherite of you yet!”

          I am halfway through the book and halfway converted. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          Posted by Major Styles | January 31, 2017, 15:42
        • If only these Protesting Snowflakes were as widely read, as intelligent or as moral as they think they are! Blind ignorance of the twitterati and celebrity set is leading us towards a disaster. How can these ignoramuses be so influenced by a religious, medieval, totalitarian death cult?

          Like

          Posted by Dr B | January 31, 2017, 15:47
        • I like that expression – the Twitterati. Perfectly suits the hashtag activism crowd.

          Liked by 1 person

          Posted by Major Styles | January 31, 2017, 16:28
  3. Words failed me as Dr B and I sat watching John’s presentation unfold. Sadly he died very suddenly soon after and no one ever found a copy of that family tree.

    Liked by 1 person

    Posted by Dr C | January 31, 2017, 12:39

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