From USA Cities to Medieval English Churches


We are exhausted, worn out, drained! The three week Trans USA rail journey is to blame, a whirlwind of cities, national parks, hotels, trains, buses, rivers, architecture has taken its toll on us physically and mentally. Time for a period of rest and recuperation before our month in France exploring a few wine regions. Which … Continue reading From USA Cities to Medieval English Churches

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A walk into the Neolithic


It's only a short 30min drive from our house to a small but interesting Late Neolithic set of stone circles we had been meaning to visit for some time; Not on as grand a scale as Avebury or Stonehenge, but worth the trip even if it was snowing and the windchill had the temperature at … Continue reading A walk into the Neolithic

Cumbria:A nuclear poem from Norman Nicholson


In May this year it will be 30 years since the death of Norman Nicholson the Cumbrian poet from Millom and I wonder if his life and works will be celebrated as they should be, even locally? I was born and grew up only a mile away from Norman's home but never met him and … Continue reading Cumbria:A nuclear poem from Norman Nicholson

Local:Favourite Photo 2016 and Medieval Political Correctness


Favourite Photo 2016 and Medieval Political Correctness I suppose its that time of the year when we all look back a little as well as forwards to review the “best bits” of the previous year. So, best overall holiday was in Burgundy, best city visited was Budapest, best winemaker visited, best book read, etc etc. A … Continue reading Local:Favourite Photo 2016 and Medieval Political Correctness

Local:Churches as history teachers


Did you know that in medieval times the interior walls of churches were painted with the equivalent of PowerPoint presentations for a congregation who couldn't read, or that lych gates were built at church entrances to store corpses before burial and that the word "lych" is old Saxon for corpse? Or that locally, John Keble … Continue reading Local:Churches as history teachers